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PSHE

PSHE stands for Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education and is an important and necessary part of all pupils’ education. At Connaught Junior School, pupils learn about themselves as growing and changing individuals with their own experiences and ideas, and as members of wider communities. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the last 3 years, we have followed the Jigsaw scheme of work which brings together PSHE Education, emotional literacy, social skills and spiritual development in a comprehensive scheme of learning. The scheme has two main aims; to build the children’s capacity for learning and to equip them for life.   We use PSHE education to build, where appropriate, on the statutory content already outlined in the national curriculum, the basic school curriculum and in statutory guidance on: drug education, financial education, sex and relationship education (SRE) and the importance of physical activity and diet for a healthy lifestyle.

 

The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness. Mindfulness is being able to observe your own thoughts and feelings as they happen, in the present moment, applying no judgement. Jigsaw teaches children to understand their thoughts and feelings and through lessons and Calm Me time exercises, helping to develop their awareness, and their capacity to be mindful human beings. Learning is thus enhanced as emotions are regulated, behaviour managed and calmness generated.

Jigsaw brings together PSHE Education, emotional literacy, mindfulness, social skills and spiritual development. A variety of teaching strategies are used and are mindful of each child’s preferred learning style. Jigsaw is designed as a whole school approach, with all year groups working on the same theme at the same time. This generates a whole school focus for adults and children alike. There is a Weekly Celebration in class that highlights a theme from that week’s lesson, and encourages children to reflect that learning in their behaviour and attitudes.

 

‘I love our JIGSAW lessons, we get to share our thoughts and feelings with each other and everyone always listens and offers support and advice without judging.’

Alex

 

There are six Puzzles (half-term units of work). Every year group studies the same Puzzle at the same time (sequentially ordered from September to July), allowing for whole school themes and the end of Puzzle product, for example, a display or exhibition (like the Garden of Dreams and Goals) to be shared and celebrated by the whole school. Each year group is taught one lesson per week and all lessons are delivered in an age- and stage-appropriate way so that they meet children’s needs. 

Puzzle 1 - Being Me in My World

Puzzle 1 covers a wide range of topics, including a sense of belonging, welcoming others and being part of a school community, a wider community, and a global community; it also looks at children’s rights and responsibilities, working and socialising with others, and pupil voice.

Puzzle 2 - Celebrating Difference

Puzzle 2 focuses on similarities and differences and teaches about diversity, such as disability, racism, power, friendships, and conflict; children learn to accept everyone’s right to ‘difference’, and most year groups explore the concept of ‘normal’; bullying – what it is and what it isn’t, including cyber and homophobic bullying – is an important aspect of this Puzzle.

Puzzle 3 - Dreams and Goals

Puzzle 3 aims to help children think about their hopes and dreams, their goals for success, what personal strengths are, and how to overcome challenges, via team work skills and tasks. There is also a focus on enterprise and fundraising. Children learn about experiencing and managing feelings of pride, ambition, disappointment, success; and they get to share their aspirations, the dreams and goals of others in different cultures/countries, and their dreams for the world.

Puzzle 4 - Healthy Me

Puzzle 4 covers two main areas of health: Emotional health (relaxation, being safe, friendships, mental health skills, body image, relationships with food, managing stress) and Physical health (eating a balanced diet, physical activity, rest and relaxation, keeping clean, drugs and alcohol, being safe, first aid) in order for children to learn that health is a very broad topic.

Puzzle 5 - Relationships

Puzzle 5 has a wide focus, looking at diverse topics such as families, friendships, pets and animals, and love and loss. A vital part of this Puzzle is about safeguarding and keeping children safe; this links to cyber safety and social networking, as well as attraction and assertiveness; children learn how to deal with conflict, their own strengths and self-esteem. They have the chance to explore roles and responsibilities in families, and look at stereotypes. All Jigsaw lessons are delivered in an age- and stage-appropriate way so that they meet children’s needs.

Puzzle 6 - Changing Me

Puzzle 6 deals with change of many types, from growing from young to old, becoming a teenager, assertiveness, self-respect and safeguarding. Self and body image, puberty, attraction and accepting change are diverse subjects for children to explore. Each year group thinks about looking ahead, moving year groups or the transition to secondary school. Life cycles and how babies are made and grow are treated sensitively and are designed to meet children’s needs. All year groups learn about how people and bodies change. This Puzzle links with the Science curriculum when teaching children about life cycles, babies and puberty.

Useful Websites

Suggested websites for children

https://www.healthforkids.co.uk/

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/subjects/zqtnvcw

https://www.childnet.com/young-people/primary

https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/

https://www.think.gov.uk/education-resources/

 

Suggested websites for parents and carers

https://www.annafreud.org/parents-and-carers/

https://www.mind.org.uk/information-support/for-children-and-young-people/information-for-parents/

https://www.healthforkids.co.uk/

https://www.place2be.org.uk/our-services/parents-and-carers/supporting-your-child-s-mental-health/

Recommended Reading to support PSHE

Year 3

Keeping Safe and Managing Risk:

· Leave me alone, Kes Gray

· The eighteenth emergency, Betsy Byars

· I’m number one, Michael Rosen

· The angel of Nitshill Road, Anne Fine

· Bad girls, Jacqueline Wilson

· Desmond and the very mean word, Archbishop Desmond Tutu

 

Living and Growing:

· Frog in love, Max Velthuijs

· Let’s talk about girls, boys, babies, bodies, families and friends, Robie H. Haris

· Love you forever, Robert Munsch

 

Identity, Society and Equality:

· Looking after Louis, Lesley Ely

· Belonging, Jeannie Baker

· Beegu, Alexis Deacon

· Humphrey the lost whale, Wendy Tokuda

· We are Britain (poems), Benjamin Zephaniah

· The Hueys in the new jumper, Oliver Jeffers

· Secret friends, Elizabeth Laird

· Dogs don’t do ballet, Anna Kemp

 

Careers, Financial Capability and Economic Wellbeing:

· Billionaire Boy, David Walliams

· The little’s save big, Joanie Boany

· Learn about money with the Money Smart gang: series, Marianne Lewis

· In the money: a book about banking, Nancy Loewen

· Spend, save or donate, Nancy Loewen

· A chair for my mother, Vera B Williams

· Learning about earning, Rachel Eagen

 

Physical Health and Wellbeing:

· Happy belly, happy smile, Rachel Isadora

· Oliver’s vegetables, Vivian French

Year 4

Identity, Society and Equality:

· The day gogo went to vote, Elinor Batezat Sisulu

· Rosa, Nikki Giovanni

· Saving Finnegan, Sally Grindley

· The magic paintbrush, Julia Donaldson

· The journey home, Frann Preston-Gannon

 

Physical Health and Wellbeing:

· Herb, the vegetarian dragon, Jules Bass

· The boy with square eyes, Juliet Snape

 

Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing:

· How to catch a star, Oliver Jeffers

· Dr Seuss – Oh the places you’ll go

· Wonder goal, Michael Foreman

· Poem – The wrong start by Marchette Chute

· Lizzy’s ups and downs: NOT an ordinary school day, Jessica Harper

· Alexander and the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day, Judith

 

Living and Growing:

· Frog in love, Max Velthuijs

· What’s happening to me (girls), Susan Meredith

· What’s happening to me (boys), Alex Frith

· Let’s talk about girls, boys, babies, bodies, families and friends, Robie H. Haris

· Love you forever, Robert Munsch

Year 5

Living and Growing:

· How did I begin? Nick Manning and Brita Granstrom

· Let’s talk about where babies come from, Robie H. Harris

· Kids, poem by Spike Milligan

· I love my mother, poem by Benjamin Zephaniah

 

Identity, Society and Equality:

· Looking after Louis, Lesley Ely Belonging, Jeannie Baker

· Beegu, Alexis Deacon

· Humphrey the lost whale, Wendy Tokuda

· We are Britain (poems), Benjamin Zephaniah

· The Hueys in the new jumper, Oliver Jeffers

· Secret friends, Elizabeth Laire

· Dogs don’t do ballet, Anna Kemp

· The sissy duckling, Harvey Fierstein

· William’s doll, Charlotte Zolotow

· Giraffe’s can’t dance, Giles Andreae

· The boy with pink hair, Perez Hilton

· Frog is Frog, Max Velthuuks

· Crazy hair day, Barney Saltzberg

 

Keeping Safe and Managing Risk:

· Way home, Libby Hawthorn

 

Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing:

· Inside out, Disney DVD

· The huge bag of worries, Virginia Ironside

· You’ve got dragons, Kathryn Cave and Nick Mayland

· The worry website, Jacqueline Wilson

· My gerbil, poem by John Kitching

· Silly Billy, Anthony Browne

· Changes, Anthony Browne

· The red tree, Shaun Tan

· The heart and the bottle, Oliver Jeffreys

· Seal surfer, Michael Foreman

 

Careers, Financial Capability and Economic Wellbeing:

· One hen, Katie Smith Milway

· Lemonade in winter: a book about two kids counting money, Emily Jenkins

· The lemonade stand: the gang learn about starting a business, Marianne Lewis

· Too small to fail, Morris Glezman

· Rickshaw girl, Mitali Perkins

Year 6

Physical Health and Wellbeing:

· Girls under pressure, Jacqueline Wilson

· The wizard and the ugly book of shame, Pablo Bernasconi

 

Living and Growing:

· How did I begin? Nick Manning and Brita Granstrom

· Let’s talk about where babies come from, Robie H. Harris

· Kids, poem by Spike Milligan

· I love my mother, poem by Benjamin Zephaniah

 

Identity, Society and Equality:

· Hitler’s canary, Sandy Toksvig

· The unforgotten coatm Frank Cotreel Boyce

· Dia's story cloth: Hmong People's Journey of Freedom

· The land, Armin Greder

· My name is Sangoel, Karen Williams

· Azzi in between, Sarah Garland

· Mohammed’s journey / Hamzat’s jouney / Gervelie’s journey (a refugee diary), Anthony Robinson

· Four feet, two sandals, Karen Lynn Williams

· Way home, Libby Hawthorne

 

Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing:

· The wise mouse, Virginia Ironside

· The illustrated mum, Jacqueline Wilson

· My mum’s from planet Pluto, Gwyneth Rees

· Grandpa has changed, Pam Pollach and Mel Belviso

· Helicopter man, Elizabeth Fensham

· Finding a voice – friendship is a two-way street, Kim Hood

 

Keeping Safe and Managing Risk:

· Miracle on separation street, Bob Graham

 

Please take time to read the documents (attachments at the bottom of the page) designed to give you further information and guidance about our JIGSAW PSHE and RSE provision.

RSE Consultaion Process and Outcome

From September 2020, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE), along with Health Education, became statutory, and formed part of the National Curriculum.

 

At Connaught we reviewed our RSE curriculum and policy and had it ratified by Governors on the 15th July 2020. 

 

We carried out a review and consultation to be sure our RSE provision is appropriate for all our pupils based on their:

 

  • Age
  • Physical and emotional maturity
  • Religious and cultural backgrounds
  • Special educational needs and disabilities

 

 

As part of this process, the school consulted with children, parents, staff and governors which helped to inform our schools’ decisions on when and how certain content is covered.

 

This process started with the children, who are at the heart of our school.  A cross section of children were interviewed about their current RSE and PSHE teaching and learning.  They were surveyed to find out what they liked/disliked and what elements they found most informative. The children were then asked what elements they felt weren’t covered they would like to see included.

 

 

The Consultation Questions to parents were as follows:

 

Parent Questionnaire December 2020

 

In order to provide your feedback to this consultation, we would appreciate your completion of the following questionnaire.

 

 

Understanding, is being able to see the message about the RSE policy and coverage being delivered and use concepts to deal adequately with the message, whether you agree or not.

 

Agreement, is having the same opinion on the SRE policy, coverage and lessons being delivered.

 

  1. I think RSE education is an important part of the school curriculum.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

  1. I think PSHE education is an important part of the school curriculum.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

  1. RSE topics taught in school can make a real difference to young people’s lives.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

  1. PSHE topics taught in school can make a real difference to young people’s lives.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

 

  1. I feel happy to talk with my child about growing up, sex and relationships.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

 

  1. I understand the content of the RSE policy.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

  1. I agree with the content of the RSE policy.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

 

  1. I am aware of the topics that will be covered by RSE sessions at Connaught Junior School.

 

Strongly Agree

Agree

Neutral

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

 

  1. Are there any changes or additions that you think should be made to the PSHE/RSE Policy or curriculum?

 

  1. Is there anything we’re not covering that you think we need to address?

 

  1. As a parent, do you feel like you need more information or guidance on specific topics? How would this information be best communicated?

 

The staff were also part of the process.  They were involved in discussions about the curriculum coverage and how it should be taught.  Feedback on existing RSE teaching was taken on board so improvements could be made.

 

The final stage of the process involved our Governors.

 

The consultation enabled us to reach a general consensus and we made adjustments to our policy and curriculum based on this feedback.

 

I would like to thank all parents and carers who took the time to submit responses and completed the questionnaire. The responses gathered from parents were highly positive about our existing RSE curriculum and the proposed changes to our curriculum and the overwhelming consensus was that these changes reflected modern family living, and current & respectful thinking.

 

The outcome of the consultation has informed us that we need to take the following additional measure:  Age appropriate reading materials and websites to support the discussions that may arise at home, as a result of school teachings,  will be available on the website. This will include a list of age appropriate books and the authors.  We hope that this will enable parents to support learning and conversations that might occur at home. Should parents want to borrow school copies these will be made available.